Gavel Grab

Archive for the 'Media Monitoring' Category

Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to consider a legal challenge to a Texas redistricting plan, and the justices will weigh defining more explicitly what the “one person, one vote” standard means in this context, the Washington Post reported.
  • The Associated Press reported from Billings, Mt., “Court asked to reverse order preserving judge’s emails.” Gavel Grab has background.
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Tuesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The Tennessee Supreme Court was preparing to hear oral arguments in several cases this week outside of its courtroom and before high school students participating in Girls and Boys State programs, The Chattanoogan reported.
  • The Akron Beacon Journal had an article entitled, “Judge John P. O’Donnell, decider of Brelo verdict, has reputation as careful jurist.”
  • Tamir Sukkary wrote an opinion piece about the California Commission on Judicial Performance, published in the Contra Costa Times with the headline, “More transparency is needed to adequately judge the judges.”
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Thursday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The Telegraph reports that Travis Akin, executive director of Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch, angered some legal experts when he called Madison County, Illinois a “judicial hellhole.” Akin believes the legal environment in the county discourages businesses from relocating there.
  • According to philly.com, some candidates for lower courts in Pennsylvania are planning to contest the election results from Tuesday’s election.
  • Arkansas Online reports that Special Circuit Judge David Laser of Jonesboro ruled that a case against two men accused of bribing Arkansas Judge Michael Maggio should proceed. Maggio pleaded guilty to the charges against him in January.
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Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The News and Observer reports that the North Carolina House budget designated an additional $6.3 million added to the state court operating budget, and $11.9 million more for technology upgrades “that could help bring an antiquated court-filing system into the digital age.”
  • KIMT reports that further spending cuts for the Iowa judiciary will likely result in trial delays.
  • According to AzCentral, Phoenix mayor Greg Stanton will intervene in a judicial nomination process, which has stalled over calls for diversity in the nominees.
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Thursday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • An Arizona Republic editorial about a controversy involving diversity on a local court said, “It’s OK if the best judge for the job is White. Our View: Picking a presiding judge should be a matter of merit, not quota.” See Gavel Grab for background.
  • Harvard Law Professor Noah Feldman wrote at Bloomberg View regarding a Republican presidential candidate, “Ben Carson’s Dangerous View of the Law.” Gavel Grab has background about the controversy.
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Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • When Stanford University and Dartmouth researchers sent out mailers about two races for the Montana Supreme Court in 2014, they broke Montana laws, the state’s campaign regulator said, according to the Associated Press. 
  • Regarding the nomination of U.S. District Judge Judge Luis Felipe Restrepo for the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, a Luzerne County (Pa.) Citizens Voice editorial said, “Time to move judicial nomination forward.”

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Tuesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • In Atlantic, Bruce Ackerman and Ian Ayres found so much to like about the Supreme Court’s decision in Williams-Yulee vs. The Florida Bar that they suggest considering for members of Congress the campaign finance rule the court upheld for judicial candidates.
  • Jim Newell wrote a piece at Salon that was headlined, “Supreme Court’s grand ruse ends: Finally, Americans see the justices for the political hacks they are.”
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Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • In a unanimous opinion, the Illinois Supreme Court found unconstitutional a 2013 law passed to address a severe Illinois pension crisis, according to the Associated Press.
  • Actress Natalie Portman will portray Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in a film about the jurist, the International Business Times said.
  • “State court system to request emergency budget grant,” reported the Farmington (N.M.) Daily Times.
  • An Oregonlive.com commentary by Ofer Raban of the University of Oregon School of Law, about Williams-Yulee vs. The Florida Bar, was headlined, “Supreme Court gets it right on judicial elections.”
  • Kathryn Gardner, appointed to the Kansas Court of Appeals by Gov. Sam Brownback (see Gavel Grab), took the oath of office, the Topeka Capital Journal reported.
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Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • In a Reading Eagle article about this year’s Pennsylvania Supreme Court elections, Lynn Marks of Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts said special interest groups “have been giving big donations to judicial candidates, and increasingly from out of state.” PMC is a Justice at Stake partner organization.
  • Gavel to Gavel reported, “This year’s plans to cut the funding for Kansas courts if they strike down certain laws remain active in at least one bill to fund the state’s courts.” See Gavel Grab for background; Gavel to Gavel is a publication of the National Center for State Courts, a JAS partner group. 
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Tuesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Gov. Paul LePage of Maine has nominated Chief Justice Thomas Humphrey of the state Superior Court to sit on the state Supreme Court, according to Legal News Line.
  • Lincoln Caplan has a piece in American Prospect entitled, “The Junior Justice: Elena Kagan is rewriting the role of a Supreme Court justice in American democracy.”
  • The Marshall Project has written a profile about a deceased Washington judge headlined, “‘No Human Is Wise Enough to Decide Who Should Die’: The life and death of Robert Utter, former state Supreme Court justice and death penalty opponent.”
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