Gavel Grab

Archive for the 'Media Monitoring' Category

Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The New York Times editorial board said that one day, TV cameras will be permitted in the Supreme Court, and meanwhile, “The justices could save everyone a lot of trouble by letting cameras in now so all Americans could see the nine people whose decisions deeply affect their lives.”
  • A headline in Gavel to Gavel, a publication of the National Center for State Courts, declared, “Changes to mandatory judicial retirement ages: Virginia plan now law; Oregon voters will decide in November 2016 on repeal; Massachusetts proposal rejected.”
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Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The U.S. Supreme Court will hear appeals by Kansas of three cases in which the state’s highest court set aside the death penalty for defendants found guilty of murder, the Associated Press said. Last year, critics unsuccessfully opposed retention of two Kansas justices who participated in removing two of the defendants from death row (see Gavel Grab).
  • Upon the closing of the U.S. Supreme Court’s latest term, the New York Times reported, “Supreme Court Tacks Left, With Push From Disciplined Liberals.”
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Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • A Milwaukee Journal Sentinel article profiles Court of Appeals Judge Rebecca Bradley, who might run for the state Supreme Court next year.
  • A Houston Chronicle article about the impact of vacant federal district court judgeships was headlined, “Judgeship vacancies translate into delays.”
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Friday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • At Michigan Radio, Jack Lessenberry has cited a Michigan Campaign Finance Network report (see Gavel Grab) highlighting the state’s least transparent requirements for campaign finance reporting.
  • Shawnee County District Judge Larry Hendricks blocked a new Kansas law that bans a procedure used in second-trimester abortions, the Associated Press said, and the state attorney general then said the ruling relied on an unprecedented legal interpretation.
  • “Montana moves to reveal corporate campaign spending,” the Associated Press reported.
  • “African Americans need court presence,” Rance Thomas wrote in the Alton (Il.) Telegraph about the Madison County bench.

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Thursday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Judge Susan Phillips Read of the New York Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, has given notice she will resign in August, according to Courthouse News Service. The Commission on Judicial Nominations will recommend candidates for the governor to consider in appointing a successor.
  • In the (Raleigh) News & Observer, law professor John V. Orth of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill wrote an op-ed about a new law changing the way state Supreme Court justices are retained. He questioned whether the legislature’s action could affect elections for other public offices.
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Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Gov. John Hickenlooper named Colorado Court of Appeals Judge Richard Lance Gabriel to the state Supreme Court, after a nominating commission had recommended the names of Gabriel and two others for the governor’s consideration, according to 9News and the Associated Press.
  • Riots in Baltimore and Ferguson have spurred a study by a bipartisan group of U.S. senators “on a sentencing reform compromise to release well-behaved prisoners early and reduce some mandatory-minimums,” Politico reported.
  • “Nebraska Supreme Court hopeful might be benched by constitution’s fine print,” an Omaha World-Herald headline said.
  • A U.S. Senate “Committee Vote [is] Set for Restrepo, but Delay Seems Likely,” reported The Legal Intelligencer in an article that is accessible by Google searching. For background, read Gavel Grab. 
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Tuesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • The Associated Press reported regarding a former federal district judge in Montana, “Panel seeks to dismiss lawsuit over Cebull emails.” See Gavel Grab for background.
  • The New York Times’s “Upshot” blog had the following analysis: “The Roberts Court’s Surprising Move Leftward: This term so far shows potential for a greater percentage of liberal decisions than any since 1969.”
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Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Emily Bazelon wrote a New York Times magazine piece, “Better Judgment,” about judges changing their minds.
  • The ABA Journal reported  after last week’s massacre in Charleston, S.C., “Church-shooting bond judge was reprimanded for N-word advice; comments at hearing bring debate.”
  • Greg Jaffe examined in a Washington Post commentary the following question: “Why does President Obama criticize the Supreme Court so much?”
  • Another candidate, Milwaukee County Circuit Judge M. Joseph Donald, says he plans to seek a seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court in 2016, according to the Associated Press.  See Gavel Grab for background.
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Wednesday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Attorney Beth Walker formally announced she will seek the West Virginia Supreme Court seat held by Justice Brent Benjamin next year (see Gavel Grab for background), according to the Associated Press.
  • The State House News Service reported that with judicial vacancies in Massachusetts increasing, Gov. Charlie Baker will soon have a chance to make his mark on the courts.
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Monday Gavel Grab Briefs

In these other dispatches about fair and impartial courts:

  • Al Campbell blogged about continuing tensions on the Wisconsin Supreme Court, and commented negatively about former Chief Justice Shirley Abrahamson’s unwillingness to accept the legality of her removal from the top post, in a Germantown Now blog post.
  • The Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline recommended that former Family Court Judge Steven Jones be banned from running for election to the bench again, following his conviction for wire fraud, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.
  • The criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship in connection with a deadly 2010 coal mine explosion was postponed until Oct. 1, the Associated Press reported. Blankenship was a central figure in the Supreme Court’s Caperton v. Massey case about runaway election spending.
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