Sotomayor Sees ‘Injustice’ From Inadequate Legal Representation

Official Portrait of Justice Sonia SotomayorSOTOMAYOR ON LEGAL REPRESENTATION: Addressing law students in Wisconsin, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor voiced concern that in some areas of the justice system, there is a greater need to ensure adequate legal representation for people using the courts.

“For me, the lack of legal representation in some critical areas is one of the things we don’t do well,” she said, according to The (Milwaukee) Journal Sentinel. “We have an unequal representation of people in our court system. And that does I think provide an injustice that we have to pay more attention to.”

More specifics were reported by The (Madison) Capital Times: “Making the system fair also may demand publicly paid legal representation — already provided for criminal charges — be extended to civil matters such as those adjudicated in family court, and for criminal appellate issues, Sotomayor said.”

ELECTION DAY AND SUPREME COURT: “This November, we all need to be Supreme Court voters,” wrote Michele L. Jawando, vice president for Legal Progress Action at the Center for American Progress Action Fund, in The (Idaho Falls) Post Register. While Americans casting their votes on Election Day will confront many issues, “What happens with those issues often depends on who is sitting on the Supreme Court,” she said.

Given the current composition of the court and a vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, “The next president could dramatically change the nature of the U.S. Supreme Court for generations to come,” Jawando wrote.

‘STRAIGHT-TICKET VOTING’: The Supreme Court “refused to revive a Michigan law that barred straight-ticket voting,” a system “in which voters may choose a party’s entire slate with a single notation,” The New York Times reported.

KANSAS COURT ELECTION: An editorial in The New York Times turned a national spotlight on “extremist meddling” by Kansas Republicans seeking “to purge a majority of judges from the State Supreme Court” this fall. “Right-wing politicians who adhere to the fantasy that government is the problem, not the solution, are eager to politicize the courts,” the editorial said. The hot-button issues in the judicial retention (up-or-down) election were recapped in an Associated Press article.