Judge Grants Floridians Another Week to Register to Vote

voter-registrationJUDGE EXTENDS VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE: The rising role of lower federal courts in deciding voting law challenges has been mentioned by Gavel Grab, and now a federal district judge in Florida has decided a different type of voting issue: He extended until Oct. 18 a deadline for people to register to vote because of the harm caused by Hurricane Matthew.

District Judge Mark E. Walker agreed on Wednesday to the extension, according to CNN. “We’ll now be able to make up for lost time and help register people whose lives were disrupted by the storm,” said Pamela Goodman, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida. “Our goal is to help every Floridian register, vote, and be heard, and we’re grateful that the storm did not silence their voices.”

SUPREME COURT TO HEAR LAWSUIT AGAINST ASHCROFT: The Washington Post reported, “The Supreme Court on Tuesday said it would consider a long-running lawsuit against former attorney general John D. Ashcroft and other top officials filed by immigrants who say they were racially profiled and illegally detained after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.”

Does racial bias trump jury room secrecy? The Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Tuesday in Pena-Rodriguez v. Colorado, a case that raises the issue. Lawyers for a defendant in a sexual assault trial contend his rights to an impartial jury were violated after one juror told two others, “I think he did it because he’s Mexican and Mexican men take whatever they want.” You can learn more from a Reuters article or from a blog of our sister organization, Alliance for Justice.

DOING THE MATH ON THE GARLAND NOMINATION: ThinkProgress has come up with a new way of doing the math on the long-stalled nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court. It reported, “15 Republican senators openly oppose [Donald] Trump. 14 are blocking a Supreme Court nominee for him anyway.”

With one seat vacant, meanwhile, the “justices are chugging along in the slow lane,” according to The Economist. A Chicago Sun-Times editorial documented the “harm of [the] short-handed court,” and said it “hobbles along.”